Rosh Hashanah Tradition

After understanding the concept of what is Rosh Hashanah, comes the question: When is Rosh Hashanah? Before celebrating any religious festival, it our right to know about it. It is the inborn curiosity of every individual to know about religions, festivals, its customs and traditions.

  • One of the most important Rosh Hashanah Traditions and custom is that the Jews do not take a nap on Rosh Hashanah afternoon. (Some hold just for the afternoon of the first day; some hold for both the afternoons.) The source for this custom comes from the Jerusalem Talmud, ‘If one sleeps at the year's beginning (Rosh Hashanah), his good fortune likewise sleeps'.

  • Rosh Hashanah Traditions
  • Another Rosh Hashanah Tradition and custom is based on food. Two loaves of challah over which the Hamotzi (blessing) is said at a festive Shabbat or holiday meal are loaf- shaped or braided. For Rosh Hashanah, the traditional shape of the challah is round. On Sabbath, it is dipped in salt whereas on Rosh Hashanah, it is dipped in honey. This shape symbolizes the complete cycle of life.

  • In some communities, the challah is shaped like a ladder, symbolizing the fortunes of people for the year ahead—some ascend and some descend life's ladder. This Rosh Hashanah Tradition symbolizes the hope that the upcoming year will be sweet. Many also have a tradition to add raisins in their challah for added sweetness.

  • There is also a Rosh Hashanah Tradition to eat Pomegranate on this specific day as because it contains an average of 613 seeds that means fulfillment of all the 613 commandments of Torah. To do a Tashlich by a riverside, sea or a lake is also the Rosh Hashanah Tradition.

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