Mexican Holidays 2017

 

 

DateDayHoliday
1 JanSunNew Year's Day
5 FebSunConstitution Day
6 FebMonConstitution Day Holiday
20 MarMonBenito Juarez Day
13 AprThuHoly Thursday
14 AprFriGood Friday
1 MayMonLabor Day
5 MayFriAnniversary of the Battle of Puebla
16 SepSatIndependence Day
12 OctThuColumbus Day
2 NovThuAll Souls' Day
20 NovMonRevolution Day
12 DecTueLady of Guadalupe Day *
25 DecMonChristmas Day

Festivities and celebrations reach a new level with Mexican fiestas. Everything from street theaters and music, fireworks and parades, glamorous costumes, authentic food and genuine joy galore on religious observances, festivals and public holidays which are quintessential Mexican. All Mexicans and visitors plunge into the spirit of week-long fiestas to celebrate a ceremony called life.



Diez y Seis de Septiembre

The nation celebrates Independence Day on September 16. On that day in 1810, Father Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla encouraged Mexicans to rebel against the Spanish rule. Today, in towns and cities all over Mexico, citizens gather at midnight on September 15 in the main square of Mexico City to hear the President or the mayor recite Father Hidalgo's 'Cry of Dolores'. At sunrise on the following day, military and civic parades start patriotic celebrations that include fireworks, food, and music.

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Cinco de Mayo

Often confused as Mexican Independence Day, the day actually commemorates the unlikely victory of Mexican Army over the French in the Battle of Puebla on May 5, 1862. Even in the southern United States, where Mexican-American culture is ubiquitous, it is observed with great enthusiasm. Though mostly ceremonial, it is one of the most famous national holidays in Mexico. Street parades with dancing and mariachi demonstrations are held in major cities of North America.

Cinco de Mayo
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Day of the Dead

Dia de los Muertos is celebrated throughout Mexico, with each region having its own distinct cultural mark on the day. On All Saints Day, on the first day of November, kids who have died are honored as little angels. The next day, All Souls Day, has been set aside for remembering older departed loved ones. Family altars or displays are set up and decorated with person's photographs, mementos, offerings of food and other symbolic gifts. In some regions, families hold feasts and vigils at the cemetery, while in some regions, candy skeletons or sweet breads are consumed.

Day of the Dead
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The Christmas Season

Feliz Navidad! The Christmas season in Mexico commences from December 16 with Las Posadas. During this event, Mexican families partake in Christmas processions to recreate the Holy Pilgrimage of Mary to Bethlehem. Children go from door to door in the neighborhood seeking shelter and residents respond by singing and allowing the kids to enter. Usually, Mexican children receive their Christmas presents on Dia de los Santos Reyes on January 6, but after the influence of Western culture, kids have to wait only two days to open gifts.

The Christmas Season
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Lent and Easter

Mexico celebrates Carnaval, which is called Mardi Gras in the United States, with raucous parades and public display of conviviality. In Veracruz state and Mazatlan city, two of the largest pre-Lenten celebrations are held. Mexicans also observe Semana Santa and Holy Week with religious parades on Good Friday as well as Easter Sunday. The season marks the beginning of tourist season as families go on vacations.

Lent and Easter
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Dia de la Raza

Although these words literally translate as "day of the race", the October 12 is a national holiday which marks the arrival of explorer Christopher Columbus in North America. The celebrations reflect upon the Old and New World roots of Mexico. Every year, this occasion brings a new round of introspection and public debate among scholars and politicians. The day is also famous for large public gatherings and parades.

Dia de la Raza
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Dia de Nuestra Senora de Guadalupe

Our Lady of Guadalupe, the patron saint of Mexico, is a brown-skinned Virgin Mary who converted Juan Diego to Catholicism near present-day Mexico City in 1531. People believed this story only after the third appearance of the Virgin Mary was imprinted on Juan's cloak. Each year, on December 12, Mexicans honor their patron saint with religious celebrations.

Dia de Nuestra Senora de Guadalupe
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