Mexico Independence Day

 


Viva Mexico! Viva La Independencia! Long live Hidalgo! La Patria Es Primero!

September 16 marks a special occasion in Mexican history. On that day in 1810, the war that led to the independence of Mexico began. A Roman Catholic priest named Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla in a small town of Dolores gathered a congregation and uttered the battle cry "Cry of Dolores" or "Grito de Dolores". The battle cry raised the morale of Mexicans to seek freedom from the Spanish rule. The event commenced the Mexican War of Independence as the uprising began. Since October 1825, the anniversary of this event commemorates Mexican Independence Day.

The the first engagement of the insurgency, Siege of Guanajuato, occurred four days later. The nation was effectively declared free from the Spain rule after a decade of revolution on September 28, 1821. Nowadays, the patriotic and cultural celebration begin the night before September 16 and carry on to the next day.

Every year, on September 15, the Zócalo (main square) in Mexico City is adorned with flags, flowers, and lights of Mexican flag colors (green, white, and red). People buy confetti, whistles, papier-mâché helmets, and flag-colored toys. Street vendors sell authentic Mexican foods.

Around 11 pm the celebrations pause briefly as the Mexican president rings the historical bell that Father Hidalgo rang in 1810 before addressing the nation. The next day is full fiesta time as parades, fireworks, bullfights, and rodeos take place with all sorts of revelry.

Here are some traditions and celebrations on the Independence Day.

  • On the night before the Independence Day, the President of Mexico rings the bell of the National Palace in the national capital, Mexico City.
  • After the bell ringing, the President delivers the modern version of "Grito de Dolores". He ends with the threefold shout of Viva México! from the place balcony to the assembled crowd in the Plaza de la Constitución.
  • He then hoists the National Flag of Mexico to the applause of the crowd. It is followed by the mass singing of the national anthem, Himno Nacional Mexicano, with the military band.
  • On the morning of Independence Day, the military parade takes place. The national parade starts at the Zócalo and ends on the Paseo de la Reforma. It passes the Hidalgo Memorial, the El Ángel memorial column, and other landmarks along the way.
  • Similar celebrations are observed in cities and towns throughout Mexico as well as in embassies and consulates of Mexico around the world on these two days.
  • The celebration – with great national pride – is marked by parades, patriotism-themed programs, marching band competitions, and special programs on the Mexican media outlets, and even fairs and musical concerts.
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Mexican Independence Day Quotes

One flag, one land, one heart, one hand. Happy Independence Day!
-Unknown quotes
Taking it as a whole, Mexico is a grand city, and, as Cortes truly said, its situation is marvelous. — Edward Burnett Tyler
Never forget the hero's Who scarified their life's to bring up this glorious day to Mexico.
Happy Independence Day! And God bless each and every one of our troops...may you ALL find your way home safe and sound!s
Unknown quote
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