Thanksgiving Symbols

 

 

Thanksgiving is an American holiday built around a feast that brings together family and friends. First intended as a celebration of the harvest, it has come to be a day for recounting the bounty of blessings present in each person's life.

Corn: At the first Thanksgiving, Native Americans are believed to have brought large ears of this grain to the table. Accomplished farmers and hunters, the colonists' survival can be traced to the natives' willingness to share growing techniques with their new neighbors. Nowadays, it serves as both a delicious accompaniment to the turkey and a multi-colored decoration.

Turkey: The big bird is the central figure in almost every family's feast – it is known as Turkey Day for a reason, after all! Every schoolchild makes a turkey out of their hand at some point in their education,adding to the numerous cartoonish decorations available at all sorts of stores.

Cornucopia: The cornucopia symbolizes the productivity of nature. Known as the “horn of plenty,” it is a horn-shaped container or basket filled with the bounties of harvest, particularly fruits and grains. With its roots in Greek and Roman mythology, this sign of abundance now serves largely as a reminder of all the good fortune the year since last Thanksgiving has brought.

Wheat: A major symbol of the autumn harvest, wheat pops up around Thanksgiving in a variety of ways. You might find it as a decoration – twisted into a wreath or woven through a centerpiece – or on the table as part of dinner. What better way to enjoy the fruits of the farm than in a buttered roll?

Candles:Almost every centerpiece includes a candle of some kind, whether scented or otherwise. The soft glow invites a feeling of intimacy and allows the decorations to have a function beyond looking good. Plus, it serves as a quiet reminder of the advancement of technology that is a tremendous blessing to a modern nation.

Pumpkins and gourds: These vegetables are native to North America and often blossom in the Fall. Much like corn, they were readily available to those who gathered at the table for the first Thanksgiving. Though you will find them as decorations, most people include them in the form of pumpkin pie with a dollop of whipped cream on top.

Cranberries: One of the few berries that ripens perfectly in the New England weather, these tart treats were sweetened with sugar or added to dressings to give the turkey flavor. In some homes, it's customary to have the modern equivalent – canned cranberry sauce – available.

Autumn leaves: Autumn leaves are vibrant decorations in many centerpieces due to their rich colors. The red, yellow, and orange leaves bring a natural touch to floral arrangements and wreaths marking the occasion.

 

Thanksgiving Wallpapers
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